The benefits of tannin

Tannin has many virtues: it is a completely natural substance, it has a high antioxidant power and recent scientific researches have shown its effectiveness in vegetable tanned leather to contrast the activity of bacteria.

Moreover, it has an incredible flexibility of use and it is versatile among various fields of application: cosmetics, food, animal nutrition, vegetable tanning of leather and many other applications.

But the benefits of tannin are not just these ones: tannin moves a sustainable economy, respecting the environment and those who inhabit it.

Choosing products processed with tannin or containing it means encouraging a model which recognizes natural resources as precious raw materials to be protected, also through productive processes with low environmental impact.

It also means promoting the economy and the communities of mountain and rural areas, especially in Europe and the Americas, preventing the abandonment of villages and preserving local traditions.

Tannin is good three times: for the organism, for the nature and for the development of a sustainable economy.

Tannin: Good for Health, Environment and Development

Sustainability and Respect for the Environment

The extraction of tannin is an ecological process, which does not involve the use of polluting chemicals, optimizing energy resources and water consumption. Plant sources derive from responsible forest management, subject to strict regulations. Being 100% natural, tannin can be safely integrated in different production processes without any risk of contamination.

Territorial Development and Protection

From Europe to the Americas, from the Italian Chestnut forests to the Quebracho forests in Argentina or to the Tara plantations in Peru, tannin is a decisive factor in the development of local economies, being able to create jobs even in isolated areas that would be otherwise at risk of abandonment. One more reason to protect the forests, avoiding their transformation into agricultural large estates. In addition, safeguarding trees means preventing hydrogeological instability.

A “Super-Natural” Substance

Tannin is 100% natural. His unique qualities have earned him the nickname “super-natural”, a definition attributed to all natural extracts used for centuries in different processes and which today are the subject of an interesting rediscovery by the Scientific Community. They can find new applications in various industrial fields, also as an ecological alternative to synthetic chemistry.

Sustainability and Respect for the Environment

The extraction of tannin is an ecological process, which does not involve the use of polluting chemicals, optimizing energy resources and water consumption. Plant sources derive from responsible forest management, subject to strict regulations. Being 100% natural, tannin can be safely integrated in different production processes without any risk of contamination.

Territorial Development and Protection

From Europe to the Americas, from the Italian Chestnut forests to the Quebracho forests in Argentina or to the Tara plantations in Peru, tannin is a decisive factor in the development of local economies, being able to create jobs even in isolated areas that would be otherwise at risk of abandonment. One more reason to protect the forests, avoiding their transformation into agricultural large estates. In addition, safeguarding trees means preventing hydrogeological instability.

A "Super-Natural" Substance

Tannin is 100% natural. His unique qualities have earned him the nickname “super-natural”, a definition attributed to all natural extracts used for centuries in different processes and which today are the subject of an interesting rediscovery by the Scientific Community. They can find new applications in various industrial fields, also as an ecological alternative to synthetic chemistry.

A Look at the Microscope

What makes tannin so special? Its uniqueness is due to very peculiar chemical characteristics, which make it not only effective, but also extremely versatile. In particular, the tannin molecules have the ability to bind to animal proteins, stabilizing them, which is why it has always been used successfully in the leather tanning.

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